17-005 'Infinite Scroll'

ink and acrylic on paper

The web-design feature ‘Infinite Scroll’ was invented in 2005 by Aza Raskin. Made popular by Twitter, the feature continuously pushes new data to the user without requiring pagination. This technological milestone defined a cultural shift in the way humans interact with the digital world. While Raskin thought he was ‘making the world a better place’ by reducing load times and allowing for more time-efficient work. Instead, it provoked a societal addiction to social media. After producing this instant gratification driven program, Raskin now estimates that this technological feature consumes over 200,000 lifetimes every day. 

This linear grid of individual strokes combines to replicate the arrangement of pixels in digital screens. Panning from left to right, the pixels dissipate into a white void that holds just under half of the composition, indicating a continuation. The assumed existence of a pattern society has become familiar with reading. An ambiguous but expected future of what technology has to offer us, the loading of more content, and a willingness to consume what we are pushed.

17-005